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Runtime : 123 min.
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Quality: HDTitle : Beauty and the BeastDirector : Bill Condon.Release : 2017-03-15Language : English,Italiano.Runtime : 123 min.Genre : Fantasy, Romance.Synopsis : Movie ‘Beauty and the Beast’ was released in March…

Quality: HDTitle : Beauty and the BeastDirector : Bill Condon.Release : 2017-03-15Language : English,Italiano.Runtime : 123 min.Genre : Fantasy, Romance.Synopsis : Movie ‘Beauty and the Beast’ was released in March…

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HOWTO: Redmine 3.0 with Debian Wheezy, Nginx, Thin

I spent a few hours troubleshooting a problem with Thin when I upgraded from Redmine 2.5 to Redmine 3.0 on a Debian Wheezy server. I found a solution that’s worked for me. I’m not confident enough with Ruby and this setup to make a HowTo on the Redmine wiki, but I found next to nothing on this specific problem when searching the web, so I figure it’s important to post this in case it helps anyone else.

I’m running Redmine on Debian Wheezy with Nginx and Thin. I’m also running Redmine on another Wheezy server with Apache (and mod_passenger, I think). The latter upgrade to Redmine 3.0 went fine, but when I ran the same steps on the thin/nginx server, I was getting a Bad Gateway 502 error from nginx and found this in the thin logs.

!! Unexpected error while processing request: uninitialized constant Rack::MethodOverride::REQUEST_METHOD

Yet, when I ran Redmine with webrick (per Redmine’s installation instructions), it worked fine. Since it worked fine with webrick and on my other server, it seemed like the problem was at the Thin layer.

This Stack Overflow issue was the closest I could find, though it was with a different Rack application. The problem was a mismatch between the Rack version and the one required by the application.

I couldn’t find Redmine-specific examples (hence this post), but this one Redmine guide did say “Rack 1.0.1. Version 1.1 is not supported with Rails 2.3.5”.

Finally, the Stack Overflow issue linked to this issue in the Passenger tracker which pointed me towards the answer:

Your system has two Rack versions installed. One is version 1.5.0, installed by APT, and is located in /usr/lib/ruby/vendor_ruby. The other one is version 1.6.0, installed by RubyGems, and is located in /var/lib/gems/2.1.0/gems/rack-1.6.0.

Before Passenger loads your app, Passenger calls require “rack”. Because /usr/lib/ruby/vendor_ruby is in Ruby’s $LOAD_PATH, Passenger loads the Rack 1.5.0 library installed by APT.

However Sinatra requires Rack 1.6.0 or later…

This was my problem. When I installed Redmine 2.5, I ran `apt-get install thin`. It pulled in ruby-rack 1.4.1 as a dependency. This “conflict” wasn’t a problem in Redmine 2.5, which has “rack (~> 1.4.5)” in Gemfile.lock — the versions are close enough. However, Redmine 3.0 has “rack (~> 1.6)” in Gemfile.lock… hence the error I was seeing, as Rack 1.4.1 installed via apt was probably being loaded in place of the 1.6.1 Gem.

I tried to `apt-get remove ruby-rack`, but it was going to remove thin as well. (And I checked the Jessie repos, but its ruby-rack is still only 1.5.2.) I identified two solutions:

  1. Uninstall ruby-rack and thin via apt, and reinstall thin separately (this worked)
  2. Create a dummy .deb using equivs to install thin via apt without really installing ruby-rack (I didn’t bother trying this, since the first solution worked)

To install thin separately, first I removed it and ruby-rack whiling marking a couple other dependencies as manually installed and keeping the /etc/init.d/thin file…

apt-get remove ruby-rack thin
apt-get install ruby-eventmachine ruby-daemons # not sure if this was necessary or advisable, just a guess

Then, following the thin installation instructions, I was able to install the gem:
apt-get install ruby-dev build-essential
gem install thin
# Update the path in /etc/init.d/thin from /usr/bin/thin (apt) to /usr/local/bin/thin (gem)
perl -pi -w -e 's/\/usr\/bin\/thin/\/usr\/local\/bin\/thin/g' /etc/init.d/thin

I was able to start thin again (`service thin start`), but I was getting a new error for which I found the solution here: add thin to your Gemfile.

So, somewhat reluctantly, I opened up Gemfile in the Redmine root directory and in between a couple other gem lines I added the line:
gem "thin"

Then, I restarted thin, and Redmine was working again!

Things I don’t like about this solution or am unsure of:

  • Editing Redmine’s Gemfile sucks, because I’ll lose that change on every update and I’ll have to re-apply it. Since it’s a simple one-liner and updates are every few months, it works for me for now.
  • I don’t know yet whether those other apt thin dependencies are required or might cause other conflicts in the future… but since it’s working now, and I’m not familiar with Ruby, I don’t feel like spending more time to experiment and find out.
  • Maybe I should have looked at other options beside thin, like Puma or Passenger? But since I already had Thin working before, I just decided to see if I could salvage it rather than exploring alternatives. Maybe thin isn’t the best option in this circumstance though, but it’s working.
  • I’m assuming that /etc/init.d/thin was there and working because it was leftover from the apt thin installation (and because I didn’t `apt-get purge`). That may have been lucky that the init script happens to work (as far as I can tell for now) with the thin gem…

Hopefully this can help anyone else using Redmine(3.0)/Debian/Nginx/Thin seeing that error. I’d be happy to share configuration and fresh installation instructions once I have some confidence that this approach is sane, and in particular once I have a better solution than modifying the Gemfile.

I spent a few hours troubleshooting a problem with Thin when I upgraded from Redmine 2.5 to Redmine 3.0 on a Debian Wheezy server. I found a solution that’s worked…

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HOWTO: Pair a new device for the old Firefox Sync service in Firefox 30

I got into a public fight with IceWeasel/Firefox 30 and the Mozilla sync service on pump.io last month, and was meaning to publish my “fix”… but it was so hacky, I don’t know which part of it actually worked. But, since it’s somewhat time-sensitive during this sync service transition, I figure it’s better to share this incomplete hack than to not.

The Problem: Can’t Pair New Devices in Firefox/IceWeasel 30 Using the old Firefox Sync Service

I recently switched my ThinkPad X60 from Ubuntu to Debian testing. When I tried to set up IceWeasel 30 with the Mozilla sync service, it started prompting me about creating a Firefox account — something I have absolutely no interest in doing (in fact, I was planning on moving my Firefox sync to off Mozilla’s servers to ownCloud).

I discovered that, while previously paired devies would still be able to sync using Mozilla’s old sync service for a limited time, as of Firefox/IceWeasel 30, it no longer supports pairing new devices to the old sync service.

This made me really angry. If I’d set up sync and paired the device before “upgrading” to IceWeasel/Firefox 30, I’d be syncing no problem, but Firefox/IceWeasel 30 refused to allow this. It was an infuriating combination of what felt like an anti-feature, and pressure from Mozilla to sign up for a new sync service that seems worse on the privacy front (e.g. no server-side encryption, and self-hosting is experimental now because you’d also have to self-host the Accounts service…).

The Solution: Tricking IceWeasel/Firefox by editing prefs.js

Technically, this wasn’t a new device. I’d already had my X60 Firefox set up to sync before I switched from Ubuntu to Debian. So, I managed to trick IceWeasel into letting me sync again.

This was pretty reckless (but stakes very low — brand new IceWeasel profile) and I’m not sure exactly what worked and use these instructions at your own risk, etc etc.:

  • I copied the weave folder from inside my old Ubuntu Firefox profile (not sure if that mattered), plus all of the lines in prefs.js for settings that started with “services.sync.*” (this definitely mattered)
  • I tried manually editing the preferences (resetting timestamps to zero, etc.), but what ended up happening is that when I opened IceWeasel with those lines just copy-pasted in from my Firefox profile in my old Ubuntu install that I’m no longer using, it gave me the “Pair a new Device” option the first time I accessed Sync settings!!
  • It would disappear and not come back if I cancelled pairing, but I just tried closing IceWeasel, copying/pasting those services.sync.* lines into prefs.js again, and then I successfully paired IceWeasel 30 by doing it the first time it appeared.
  • I could see “tabs from my other computers” now, but my bookmarks clearly weren’t there, so I shut IceWeasel down, and changed the value of all the services.sync.*.lastSync and services.sync.*.lastSyncLocal and a couple other similar timestamps, setting them to 0 from their prior values. Then, re-opened IceWeasel, ran the sync manually, and my bookmarks started appearing! Since then, it seems everything has been working fine

I think it was something in copying the services.sync* settings that allowed the Pair a New Device screen to work the first time I reopened IceWeasel. Then, after pairing, resetting the timestamps to 0 on the services.sync.*.lastSync* settings caused IceWeasel to download everything again anew.

YMMV. I’m not sure how much my of success depended on being able to hijack an existing client sync ID from a device that was previously configured but no longer being used (i.e. my former Ubuntu Firefox profile on my X60 that I was replacing with Debian IceWeasel). And these steps are vague and unspecific because I’m not really sure what precisely worked or what may be unwise for you to try if you don’t know what you’re doing… but feel free to contact me if you want more specifics on my set up and experience and I may be able to help.

At the very least, this will allow me to continue using the old sync service for now, until I figure out what my options are re: self-hosting, ownCloud, Mozilla’s new Firefox Accounts-based sync service, etc.

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A network not of wires but of people: David Weinberger on Pope Francis

As an avid reader of both David Weinberger and Pope Francis, it was very interesting to see those two worlds collide in Weinberger’s cross-tradition interpretation of Pope Francis’ message for World Communications Day.

First, Weinberger looks at Pope Francis’ initial characterization of the Internet:

The internet, in particular, offers immense possibilities for encounter and solidarity. This is something truly good, a gift from God.

Weinberger calls this a “remarkable characterization” compared to all of the other ways Pope Francis could have started:

Not: The Internet is a source of temptations to be resisted. Not: The Internet is just the latest over-hyped communication technology, and remember when we thought telegraphs would bring world peace? Not: The Internet is merely a technology and thus just another place for human nature to reassert itself. Not: The Internet is just a way for the same old powers to extend their reach. Not: The Internet is an opportunity to do good, but be wary because we can also do evil with it. It may be many of those. But first: The Internet — its possibilities for encounter and solidarity — is truly good. The Internet is a gift from God.

While I agree with Weinberger, there is also something that is not fundamentally new. Even just looking at past World Communications Day messages over the past quarter century, Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II both typically lead with the goodness of the new technology.

“Social Networks: portals of truth and faith; new spaces for evangelization.” (Pope Benedict XVI, 2013):

“I wish to consider the development of digital social networks which are helping to create a new “agora”, an open public square in which people share ideas, information and opinions, and in which new relationships and forms of community can come into being. These spaces, when engaged in a wise and balanced way, help to foster forms of dialogue and debate which, if conducted respectfully and with concern for privacy, responsibility and truthfulness, can reinforce the bonds of unity between individuals and effectively promote the harmony of the human family. The exchange of information can become true communication, links ripen into friendships, and connections facilitate communion.”

Truth, Proclamation and Authenticity of Life in the Digital Age (Pope Benedict XVI, 2011):

“New horizons are now open that were until recently unimaginable; they stir our wonder at the possibilities offered by these new media and, at the same time, urgently demand a serious reflection on the significance of communication in the digital age. This is particularly evident when we are confronted with the extraordinary potential of the internet and the complexity of its uses.”

New Technologies, New Relationships. Promoting a Culture of Respect, Dialogue and Friendship. (Pope Benedict XVI, 2009):

“Many benefits flow from this new culture of communication […] While the speed with which the new technologies have evolved in terms of their efficiency and reliability is rightly a source of wonder, their popularity with users should not surprise us, as they respond to a fundamental desire of people to communicate and to relate to each other.”

The Media: A Network for Communication, Communion and Cooperation (Pope Benedict XVI, 2006):

“Technological advances in the media have in certain respects conquered time and space, making communication between people, even when separated by vast distances, both instantaneous and direct. This development presents an enormous potential for service of the common good and “constitutes a patrimony to safeguard and promote” (Rapid Development, 10).”

The Communications Media: At the Service of Understanding Among Peoples (Pope John Paul II, 2005):

“Modern technology places at our disposal unprecedented possibilities for good”

The Media and the Family: A Risk and a Richness (Pope John Paul II, 2004):

“The extraordinary growth of the communications media and their increased availability has brought exceptional opportunities for enriching the lives not only of individuals, but also of families.”

Internet: A New Forum for Proclaiming the Gospel (Pope John Paul II, 2002):

“For the Church the new world of cyberspace is a summons to the great adventure of using its potential to proclaim the Gospel message.”

Mass media: a friendly companion for those in search of the Father (Pope John Paul II, 1999):

“With the recent explosion of information technology, the possibility for communication between individuals and groups in every part of the world has never been greater. Yet, paradoxically, the very forces which can lead to better communication can also lead to increasing self-centredness and alienation. We find ourselves therefore in a time of both threat and promise.”

Even on other technologies… Videocassettes and audiocassettes in the formation of culture and of conscience (Pope John Paul II, 1993):

“Let me say again, and with emphasis, that the audiocassette and the videocassette are gifts of God, gifts, we may say, kept in His treasury through all the ages until our time, kept — for us.”

And even pretty early on in the days of “computer culture” going mainstream… The Christian Message in a Computer Culture (Pope John Paul II, 1990):

“Surely we must be grateful for the new technology which enables us to store information in vast man-made artificial memories, thus providing wide and instant access to the knowledge which is our human heritage, to the Church’s teaching and tradition, the words of Sacred Scripture, the counsels of the great masters of spirituality, the history and traditions of the local Churches, of Religious Orders and lay institutes, and to the ideas and experiences of initiators and innovators whose insights bear constant witness to the faithful presence in our midst of a loving Father who brings out of his treasure new things and old (cf. Mt 13:52).”

Really, what they’re doing here is following the basic pattern of Genesis — first, the goodness of creation, then, the problem of sin.

So, the affirmation of goodness can be traced back to the Church’s earliest proclamations on the Internet and computer culture, in World Communications Day messages as well as in other documents. But, there is something that seems to have shifted about the Papal characterizations of what the Internet is. As Weinberger writes:

The Catholic Church put the “higher” in “hierarchy,” so it’d be understandable if it viewed the Internet as a threat to its power. Or as a source of sinful temptation. Because it’s both of those things. The Pope might even have seen the Internet quite positively as a powerful communication medium for getting out the Church’s message.

While the first two characterizations are more caricatures, the third is not. Certainly in some messages from Pope John Paul II, you can see more of an emphasis on the Internet as a tool for evangelization (though, keeping in mind that evangelization requires dialogue or personal communication and encounter — it’s still not a broadcast approach). It might be said that Pope Benedict XVI picked up on this, but further developed some thinking on relationships, and here Pope Francis picks up and focuses on the Internet as a way of encountering our neighbours. A more thorough analysis of other writings might be required to support that conclusion, but there does seem to be something new in Pope Francis’ emphasis.

As Pope Francis writes (emphasis added):

It is not enough to be passersby on the digital highways, simply “connected”; connections need to grow into true encounters. We cannot live apart, closed in on ourselves. We need to love and to be loved. We need tenderness. Media strategies do not ensure beauty, goodness and truth in communication. The world of media also has to be concerned with humanity, it too is called to show tenderness. The digital world can be an environment rich in humanity; a network not of wires but of people. The impartiality of media is merely an appearance; only those who go out of themselves in their communication can become a true point of reference for others. Personal engagement is the basis of the trustworthiness of a communicator. Christian witness, thanks to the internet, can thereby reach the peripheries of human existence.

As Weinberger puts it (emphasis added):

For the Pope, the Internet is an opportunity to understand one another by hearing one another directly. This understanding of others, he says, will lead us to understand ourselves in the context of a world of differences […]

If we frame the Internet as being about people being human to one another, people being neighbors, the differences in belief are less essential and more tolerable. Neighbors manifest love and mercy. Neighbors find value in theirs differences. Neighbors first, communicators on occasion and preferably with some beer or a nice bottle of wine.

Neighbors first. I take that as the Pope’s message, and I think it captures the gift the Internet gives us. It is also makes clear the challenge. The Net of course poses challenges to our souls or consciences, to our norms and our expectations, to our willingness to accept others into our hearts, but also a challenge to our understanding: Stop thinking about the Net as being about communication. Start thinking about it as a place where we can choose to be more human to one another.

That I can say Amen to.

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SOLUTION: gPodder 2.20.3 on N900: database disk image malformed

After some strange behaviour in gPodder 2.20.3 yesterday on my N900 (not responding to episode actions), I quit gPodder and tried to start it up again, but it would crash during startup everytime with an error about “database disk image malformed” from line 316 of dbsqlite.py on the query: “SELECT COUNT(*), state, played FROM episodes GROUP BY state, played”.

First, I opened up the sqlite database directly:
sqlite3 ~/.config/gpodder/database.sqlite

I could run that query and others no problem.

However, I found this guide on repairing a corrupt sqlite database, I ran the following integrity check command and it returned a couple errors along with the “database disk image malformed” message:
sqlite> pragma integrity_check;

So I followed the instructions from spiceworks, dumped my database to file and reloaded it into a new database:
cd ~/.config/gpodder/
echo .dump | sqlite3 database.sqlite > gpodder.sql # generate dump file
mv database.sqlite database.sqlite.bak # backup original database
sqlite3 -init gpodder.sql database.sqlite # initialize a new database from the dump file

And, voila, gPodder is working again.

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HOWTO: CalDAV/CardDAV Sync from N900 to SOGo using SyncEvolution

When I moved to Maemo in 2010, I was using Google Calendar. I setup a sync via Exchange and eventually Erminig, which allowed me to sync my wife’s Google calendar too. But, when I started degooglifying and moving to free network services, I left Google Calendar for Funambol, using SyncEvolution as a Maemo SyncML client.

This was far from ideal: we lost shared calendars, there was no web UI, and desktop SyncML options were lacking. I quickly realized that CalDAV would be the better long-term option. I choose SOGo as my CalDAV server, but I couldn’t find a CalDAV client for the N900. (I tried the Funambol SOGo Connector. but just couldn’t figure it out.)

I’d just about given up on a comprehensive sync solution in Maemo… until I hit the jackpot a few days ago and stumbled upon a post by Thomas Tanghus on a CalDAV/CardDAV sync from the N900 to ownCloud using SyncEvolution.

It looks like SyncEvolution gained CalDAV/CardDAV support in version 1.2 — the N900 has a CalDAV client!

CalDAV/CardDAV Sync using SyncEvolution

Thomas’ instructions were for ownCloud, but they work for any CalDAV/CardDAV server. I only ran into two issues, I think because I’d been using SyncEvolution pre-1.2. The steps included here are 90% from Thomas, with those two additions.

Reinstallation

First, I ran into the same problem as Wolfgang: the SyncEvolution WebDAV template wasn’t there when I tried to run Thomas’ first step. Wolfgang’s solution worked for me as well: just uninstall and reinstall SyncEvolution.

$ root
# apt-get remove syncevolution syncevolution-frontend
# apt-get install syncevolution syncevolution-frontend

I suspect you’ll need to do this if you initially installed SyncEvolution before it included WebDAV support.

Configuration

After reinstalling, I was successfully able to follow Thomas’ instructions (ignore the “backend failed” notices in the first command):

syncevolution --configure --template webdav username=YOURUSERNAME password=YOURPASSWORD target-config@sogo
syncevolution --configure database=CALDAVURL backend=caldav target-config@sogo calendar
syncevolution --configure database=CARDAVURL backend=carddav target-config@sogo contacts

The CalDAV URL for your default SOGo calendar is http://YOURSOGOINSTALL/dav/YOURUSERNAME/Calendar/personal and the CardDAV URL for your default SOGo addressbook is http://YOURSOGOINSTALL/dav/YOURUSERNAME/Contacts/personal. Your can right-click on any additional calendars in SOGo and select Properties > Links to find the CalDAV link for that particular calendar.

I ran into another issue with the next step in Thomas’ instructions. The above commands created new configuration files in /home/user/.config/syncevolution/sogo/, but the following commands operate on /home/user/.config/syncevolution/default/, in which I already had existing, older SyncEvolution configuration files. SyncEvolution complained about my pre-existing configuration, probably because I’d installed a much earlier version of SyncEvolution, and it said that I’d need to “migrate” with the following command:

syncevolution --migrate '@default'

Again, I suspect you’ll need to run this if you’d installed SyncEvolution pre-1.2. After this, I was able to continue with Thomas’ instructions.

In the following command, the username/password should stay blank:

syncevolution --configure --template SyncEvolution_Client sync=none syncURL=local://@sogo username= password= sogo

Then, configure the databases, backend and sync mode for calendar and contacts:

syncevolution --configure sync=two-way backend=calendar database=N900 sogo calendar
syncevolution --configure sync=two-way backend=contacts database=file:///home/user/.osso-abook/db sogo contacts

I’m running SSL on my server, so I had to add this step to get past an SSL error:
syncevolution --configure SSLVerifyServer=0 target-config@sogo

(I bet there’s a way to configure it to properly verify the SSL certificate… but I’ll save that for another day.)

Testing

To test the configuration:

syncevolution --print-items target-config@sogo calendar
syncevolution --print-items target-config@sogo contacts

If that shows the data you expect to be there, then go ahead and run your first sync.

First Sync

SyncEvolution has several sync modes. The above commands configured the default mode to be ‘two-way’, but if you have initial data on both your client and server, you’ll want to run a ‘slow’ sync first.

syncevolution --sync slow sogo

My initial slow sync took almost an hour for ~2540 calendar events and ~160 contacts.

(If you want to overwrite your client with data from the server, or vice versa, look up ‘refresh-from-client’ or ‘refresh-from-server’ instead of ‘slow’.)

Scheduling

After that initial sync, you can run a normal sync at anytime:

syncevolution sogo

While the command line is great for configuration and testing, you don’t want to open a terminal every time you want to sync your calendar. You could schedule the sync command via fcrontab, but the Maemo syncevolution-frontend GUI has a daily scheduler.

Maemo SyncEvolution Frontend

UPDATE: Syncing Multiple Calendars

I’ve adapted the above commands to create new target-configs for two other calendars I want to sync — my wife’s and my childcare calendar for my son. There may be a more elegant way to reuse the same target-config, but this works.

First, in the Calendar application, under Settings > Calendars, I created one for my wife’s calendar called “Heather” and one for my son’s calendar called “Noah.”

You can view all the available databases with the follow command:syncevolution --print-databases

You should see your new calendar listed here. It can be used by name, so long as that name is unique (and there aren’t any special characters to escape).

Then, adapting the above commands:
##### Heather
syncevolution --configure --template webdav username=MYUSERNAME password=MYPASSWORD target-config@sogoheather
syncevolution --configure database=HEATHERCALDAVURL backend=caldav target-config@sogoheather calendar
syncevolution --configure --template SyncEvolution_Client sync=none syncURL=local://@sogoheather username= password= heather@heather
# A one-way sync is fine here, because I just want to view my wife's calendar
syncevolution --configure sync=one-way-from-remote backend=calendar database=Heather heather@heather calendar
syncevolution --configure SSLVerifyServer=0 target-config@sogoheather
syncevolution --print-items target-config@sogoheather calendar
# no need for a first slow sync with one-way mode set
syncevolution heather
##### Noah
syncevolution --configure --template webdav username=MYUSERNAME password=MYPASSWORD target-config@sogonoah
syncevolution --configure database=NOAHCALDAVURL backend=caldav target-config@sogonoah calendar
syncevolution --configure --template SyncEvolution_Client sync=none syncURL=local://@sogonoah username= password= noah@noah
syncevolution --configure sync=two-way backend=calendar database=Noah noah@noah calendar
syncevolution --configure SSLVerifyServer=0 target-config@sogonoah
syncevolution --print-items target-config@sogonoah calendar
# refresh-from-remote is faster than slow, and I know the local calendar is empty
syncevolution --sync refresh-from-remote noah

YMMV and you may want different configuration for your additional calendars, but this should give you some examples for how to configure additional calendars. The key different in these commands, besides the straight replacements, is to add a unique source name to all the –configure commands from SyncEvolution_Client on (except the SSL fix for the target-config), so that the client config ends up distinct from your primary calendar above.

Lastly, using the syncevolution-frontend, I scheduled daily automatic syncs for these two calendars as well, at different times.

Conclusion

I’m not sure if there’s a more elegant/concise configuration. I’m curious if there’s some way to combine the ‘target-config’ and ‘sogo’ steps… but Thomas spent over 12 hours on this and it works, so I’m not going to mess with it. I’m just thrilled that I’ve got this up and running.

After more than a decade in proprietary software slavery, and nearly two years of wandering in the calendar/contacts desert, I’ve finally reached the promised land of seamless and libre mobile, web and desktop calendar/contact sync. [Edit: Almost: The Maemo calendar application is proprietary…] Thank you, Thomas!

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Poster Movie Nocturnal Animals 2016

Nocturnal Animals (2016) HD

Director : Tom Ford.
Producer : Tom Ford, Robert Salerno.
Release : November 4, 2016
Country : United States of America.
Production Company : Universal Pictures, Artina Films, Fade to Black Productions, Focus Features.
Language : English.
Runtime : 116 min.
Genre : Drama, Thriller.

‘Nocturnal Animals’ is a movie genre Drama, was released in November 4, 2016. Tom Ford was directed this movie and starring by Amy Adams. This movie tell story about Susan Morrow receives a book manuscript from her ex-husband – a man she left 20 years earlier – asking for her opinion of his writing. As she reads, she is drawn into the fictional life of Tony Hastings, a mathematics professor whose family vacation turns violent.

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Degooglifying (Part III): Web Search

This post is part of a series in which I am detailing my move away from centralized, proprietary network services. Previous posts in this series: email, feed reader.

Of all Google services, you’d think the hardest to replace would be search. Yet, although search is critical for navigating the web, the switching costs are low — no data portability issues, easy to use more than one search engine, etc. Unfortunately, there isn’t a straightforward libre web search solution ready yet, but switching away from Google to something that’s at least more privacy-friendly is easy to do now.

Quick Alternative: DuckDuckGo

In on sense, degooglifying search is easy: use DuckDuckGo. DuckDuckGo has a strong no-tracking aproach to privacy. The !bang syntax is awesome (hello !wikipedia), the search results are decent (though I still often !g for more technical, targeted or convoluted searches), it doesn’t have any search-plus-your-world nonsense or whatever walled garden stuff Google has been experimenting with lately, and it’s pretty solid on the privacy side. After just a few days, DuckDuckGo replaced Google as my default search engine, and my wife has since switched over as well.

The switch from Google Search to DuckDuckGo is incredibly easy and well worth it. If you’re still using Google Search, give DuckDuckGo a try — you’ve got nothing to lose.

But… DuckDuckGo isn’t a final destination. Remember: the point of this exercise isn’t for me to “leave Google,” but to leave Google’s proprietary, centralized, walled gardens for free and autonomous alternatives. DuckDuckGo is a step towards autonomy, as web search sans tracking, but it is still centralized and proprietary.

Web Search Freedom

A libre search solution calls for a much bigger change — from proprietary to free, from centralized to distributed, from a giant database to a peer-to-peer network — not just a change in search engines, but a revolution in web search.

YaCy

Last summer, I ran a search engine out of my living room for a few months: YaCy — a cross-platform, free software, decentralized, peer-to-peer search engine. Rather than relying on a single centralized search provider, YaCy users can install the software on their own computers and connect to a network of other YaCy users to perform web searches. It’s a libre, non-tracking, censorship-resistant web search network. The problem was that it wasn’t stable or mature enough last summer to power my daily web searches. I intend to install it again soon, because as a peer-to-peer effort it needs users and usage in order to improve, but an intermediate step like DuckDuckGo is necessary in the meantime.

Although YaCy is designed to be installed on your own computer, there is a public web search portal available as a demo.

Seeks

Seeks is another interesting project that takes a different approach to web search freedom. Seeks is “an open, decentralized platform for collaborative search, filtering and content curation.” As far as I understand, Seeks doesn’t replace existing search engines, but it adds a distributed network layer on top of them, giving users more control over search queries and results. That is, Seeks is a P2P collaborative filter for web search rather than a P2P indexer like YaCy. Rather than replacing web indexing, Seeks is focused on the privacy, control, and trust surrounding search queries and results, even if it sits on top of proprietary search engines.

Seeks also has a public web search portal (and DuckDuckGo supports !seeks). As you can tell, its results are much better than YaCy’s, but Seeks is tackling a smaller problem and still relying on existing search engines to index the web.

Conclusion

DuckDuckGo, though proprietary and centralized, provides some major privacy advantages over Google and is ready to be used today — especially with Google just a !g away.

But web search freedom requires a revolution like that envisioned by YaCy or Seeks. Seeks seems like more of a practical, incremental and realistic solution, but it still depends on proprietary search. YaCy is more of a complete solution, but it’s not clear whether its vision is technically feasible.

I intend to experiment with both of these projects — p2p services need users to improve — and continue to watch this space for new developments.

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Degooglifying (Part II): Feed Reader

This post is part of a series in which I am detailing my move away from centralized, proprietary network services. Previous posts in this series: email.

Next to email, replacing Google Reader as my feed reader was relatively easy, though I’ve chosen to use the move as an opportunity to clean out my feed subscriptions, rather than doing a straight export/import. I’ve replaced Google Reader with two free software feed readers: Liferea (desktop) and Tiny Tiny RSS (web).

A reading list can be very personal, and it can also be very misleading out of context. For example, my reading list suggests all sorts of things about my religious and political views, about the communities to which I may be connected, etc. Though, it would take some analysis to try and figure out why I subscribe to any particular feed. Is the author’s view one I espouse and whole-heartedly hold as my own? One I find interesting, challenging, or thought-provoking? Or one I utterly disagree with yet want to learn more about?

There is something private about a complete reading list, much like the books you might check out from the library or the videos you might rent from a store. As we get more of this content through the internet, it’s easy for these lists (and even more behavioural data about how we interact with them) to be compiled in large, centralized, proprietary databases, alongside all sorts of other personal information that would not be available to a traditional Blockbuster or public library. Besides the software fredom issues, this is another revealing personal dataset that I can claim more control over by exercising software freedom, rather than dumping it into a big centralized, proprietary database. Both software freedom and privacy issues are at play here.

Desktop Client: Liferea

Liferea is a desktop feed reader for GNU/Linux. Google Reader was my first feed reader, so a desktop feed reader was a bit of an adjustment, but there are a few things I really like about it:

  • Native application: It integrates well with my desktop, with something like Ubuntu’s Messaging Menu, and it’s a client that feels somewhat familiar in GNOME.
  • Control over update frequency: One of the things that bugged me about Google Reader is it constantly checks for new content, whether or not you want it to. Sometimes, I don’t want to see anything new until tomorrow. It’s nice to be able to click update, read, and then let it be until I choose to update again. (Though, the downside is missing material if you don’t update often enough.)
  • Integration with Google Reader / Tiny Tiny RSS: This is a killer feature. You can use Liferea to read feeds through the Google Reader API, and recent versions have added support for a tt-rss backend as well. This helped with my transition because I could use Liferea as a front-end for Google Reader before I was prepared to migrate my feeds, to test it out, to ease the transition, etc. And, I will be able to use Liferea and tt-rss together to have both desktop and web-based clients.
  • Embedded Web Browser: This is also a killer feature. Websites that don’t have full-text feeds and only offer a content snippet are annoying in Google Reader, because you have to leave Reader to see the full content. But, in Liferea, you can tell it to automatically load content for a feed using the embedded web browser instead of just viewing the snippet, or hit enter on any feed entry to load the URL using the embedded browser. It even has basic tabbed browsing support, so you don’t have to flip back and forth between your web browser and your feed reader. This makes reading content from non-full-text feeds easy without leaving Liferea.
  • Integrated Comments: Liferea can detect comment feeds on many blogs, and it shows a handful of comments underneath entries. Combine this with a quick enter key to visit the web page with the embedded browser, and you no longer have to leave the feed reader to participate in the comments. This is a nice step up from the usual isolation of a feed reader from comment threads.
  • Authentication support for protected feeds: This is a useful feature for subscribing to protected content, such as an updates feed on an internal wiki.

I tested Liferea as a Google Reader front end, then migrated subscriptions group by group (giving me a chance to re-organize, though I could have just used an OPML export/import), and once I upgrade to Liferea 1.8, I’ll connect it to tt-rss.

Other Desktop Clients: RSSOwl is a free software, cross-platform (Windows, Mac OS X, GNU/Linux) feed reader, which also has Google Reader integration. I have only tried this briefly, so that I could recommend it to Windows users.

Web Client: Tiny Tiny RSS

Tiny Tiny RSS is a web-based feed reader, similar to Google Reader, but free software that you can run on your own web server. There are some feeds I read all the time, and others I’ll skim or catch up on when I have a chance. For the must-read feeds, it makes a huge difference to be able to read them from my mobile computer. With Google Reader, I used grr, and there is a mobile web interface. I migrated my must-read feeds to tt-rss instead of Liferea so that I’d have easy access to them while away from my laptop, while still having the ability to use Liferea when on my laptop with it’s tt-rss integration. I’m moving more and more feeds into tt-rss, though I plan to leave some less frequently updated, less important feeds or feeds that are difficult to read from my mobile in Liferea only.

Some cool features:

  • Publish articles to shared feed: Google Reader had a shared articles RSS feed, and I’d piped that into blaise.ca. tt-rss has a similar RSS feed, which I’ve also been able to include on my website
  • Mobile web interface: tt-rss has a mobile web interface for webkit browsers powered by iUI. With Macuco on my N900 or the Android web browser, it works quite well — though, only for full-text feeds.
  • Filters: With tt-rss, you can create filters on feeds. So, for example, I am automatically publishing articles from the Techdirt feed that I’ve written, or I can auto-delete posts for a particular series or author that I’m not interested in to custom tailor a feed to my interests. It’s very useful for automating certain actions or reducing noise on a high-traffic feed.
  • Custom CSS: I suppose you could customize Google Reader’s styles with a GreaseMonkey script or something, but tt-rss offers custom CSS overrides and multiple themes out of the box, which is great for setting some more readable default colours.
  • API: tt-rss has an API, which allows for Liferea integration, an Android client, etc.
  • Authentication support for protected feeds: Like Liferea, tt-rss provides support for feeds requiring authentication.

As with Liferea, tt-rss gives me control over how frequently updates run, since I schedule the update job. But that control also comes without the downside of missing content if I’m away from my feed reader for a while; unlike a desktop client that needs to be open to retrieve new content, tt-rss does so in the background from the server, so it can still track new entries while I’m away. It has the benefits of Google Reader’s persistent background updates, while still giving me control over frequency and scheduling. I have the update job set to run a few specific times through the day, and tt-rss gives you the option to set an even longer update interval for any given feed.

While I was initially migrating from Google Reader to Liferea, Tiny Tiny RSS is quickly becoming my primary feed reader, while Liferea will become my primary desktop client for tt-rss and home for less frequent/important/non-full-text feeds.

Other Web Clients: NewsBlur is another web-based, free software feed reader, which is based on a more modern web stack and seems to have some neat features. I have yet to try it, and I’m not sure of the state of its mobile or API/desktop integration, which are two things I really like in tt-rss. It’s worth taking a look at though for sure. NewsBlur.com has a hosted service, if you aren’t able to run your own web server or don’t have a friend who’s running one.

Conclusion

My migration away from Google Reader is essentially complete. I have less than a dozen feeds remaining there, but mostly old or broken feeds. I no longer log into Google Reader to read anything, though I’ve got one more round of cleaning to do to empty my account. I’m currently split between Liferea and tt-rss, but with Liferea 1.8, I’ll be able to integrate the two. I also have other libre options to explore with NewsBlur and RSSOwl.

There is nothing that I miss about Google Reader, and if anything, with an embedded browser, native desktop options, integrated comments, control over update scheduling, feed filters, and authentication support for protected feeds, I have a lot of useful features now that I didn’t have with Google’s proprietary service — nevermind more software freedom and less surveillance.

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